TRIZ GB Applications

TRIZ GB supports generating ideas in various domains from technology, to advertisement, to management and business. It has the following features:

  • A system of inventive principles with short text and icons for easy recall.
  • Short examples to illustrate usage of each principle.
  • Ability to capture generated ideas and send them by email.
  • Add your own examples of inventive principles to customize your app.

 

Different ways to use TRIZ GB:

 

The simplest way to use TRIZ GB - Idea generation

 

Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of TOC

 

Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of Six Sigma

 

Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of Value Engineering

 

Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of Lean

 

Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of I-MUST

 

Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of SWOT

 

Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of Fishbone Diagrams

 


The simplest way to use TRIZ GB - Idea generation.

Step 1. Define what you need in a short statement

Step 2. Apply inventive principles to uncover and utilize available resources:

  1. Begin in the Resources group. Use the inventive principles one by one as hints for idea generation, and then move on to another group.
  2. Define entities which could be changed in your situation (elements, actions, and environment). Apply recommendations suggested by the principle.
  3. Typical time is 2-3 minutes per principle - then write down all ideas and go to the next principle.

Step 3. Finalize your work by evaluating ideas and then assembling them into concepts.

 

Example:

Your boss calls an urgent meeting to discuss ideas for increasing sales 10%. You have only 1 hour to prepare.

Step 1. Define what you need in a short statement. How to Increase Sales by 10%?

Step 2. Apply inventive principles to uncover and utilize available resources. (Only partial list of ideas shown)

Resources

Power/Energy: Create incentives to motivate salesmen. Offer sales incentives to motivate customers.

Elements: Use technical staff to assist Sales.

Information: Survey customers to get vital feedback for improving your product/service.

Derived: Establish an advertising campaign to increase your company’s image.

Intensify: Accumulate list of similar sales prospects and conduct a webinar on your product/service for them.

Time

Pauses: Use Customer Service personal to assist Sales when activity is low.

Accelerate: Offer incentives for a short time.

Space

Take out: Use outside sales agents (reps) to augment current staff.

Localize: Use local promotional events.

Structure

Exclude: Exclude sales personnel – utilize on-line sales vehicle.

Integrate: Bundle products together

Conditions

Dynamism: Offer variable pricing (i.e., quantity discounts)

Disposable: Hire temporary sales force.

Inversion: (Buy instead of Sell) Offer Trade-in value for old product on purchase of new.

Step 3. Finalize your work by evaluating ideas and then assembling them into concepts.

Several workable concepts can be formulated by combining various ideas.

 

As you can see, it is quick and easy to generate a list of ideas to prepare for the meeting.

 


Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of TOC

Step 1. Relate revealed key UDEs (undesired effects) or assumptions to one of the following groups:

  • Resource (materials, energy or information) connected UDEs or assumptions
  • Time connected UDEs or assumptions
  • Space connected UDEs or assumptions
  • Structure connected UDEs or assumptions (connected, for example, with interactions or elements)
  • Conditions connected UDEs or assumptions

Such a classifying of UDEs enables one to address inventive principles form the appropriate group to remove or reduce it.

Step 2. Apply inventive principles to uncover and utilize available resources in order to remove UDEs or assumptions:

  1. Start from the group of principles related to the UDE. Use the inventive principles one by one as hints for idea generation.
  2. Define entities which could be changed in your situation (elements, actions, and environment). Apply recommendations suggested by the principle.
  3. Typical time is 2-3 minutes per principle - then write down all ideas and go to the next principle.
  4. After using an appropriate group of principles it is strongly recommended then to move on to other groups.

Step 3. Finalize your work by evaluating ideas and then assembling them into concepts.

 


Usage TRIZ GB in the Framework of Six Sigma

Step 1. Relate revealed process variability causes (sources) to one of the following groups:

  • Resource (materials, energy or information) connected process variation causes (sources)
  • Time connected process variation causes (sources)
  • Space connected process variation causes (sources)
  • Structure connected process variation causes (for example, unnecessary interactions or elements)
  • Conditions connected process variation causes (sources)

Such a classifying of process variation causes (sources) enables one to address inventive principles from the appropriate group to remove or reduce it.

Step 2. Apply inventive principles to uncover and utilize available resources in order to remove or reduce the process variation:

  1. Start from the group of principles related to the process variability identified. Use the inventive principles one by one as hints for idea generation.
  2. Define entities which could be changed in your situation (elements, actions, and environment). Apply recommendations suggested by the principle.
  3. Typical time is 2-3 minutes per principle - then write down all ideas and go to the next principle
  4. After using an appropriate group of principles it is strongly recommended then to move on to other groups.

Step 3. Finalize your work by evaluating ideas and then assembling them into concepts.

 


Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of Value Engineering

Step 1. Relate critical parameter(s) of revealed useful or harmful function(s) to one of the following groups:

  • Resource (materials, energy or information) related parameter(s)
  • Time related parameter(s)
  • Space related parameter(s)
  • Structure related parameter(s) (for example, connected to interactions between elements)
  • Conditions related parameter(s)

Such a classifying of critical parameter(s) of useful or harmful functions enables one to address inventive principles from the appropriate group to improve useful functions or counteract harmful ones

Step 2. Apply inventive principles to uncover and utilize available resources in order to improve useful or counteract functions:

  1. Start from the group of principles related to the critical parameters. Use the inventive principles one by one as hints for idea generation.
  2. Define entities which could be changed in your situation (elements, actions, and environment). Apply recommendations suggested by the principle.
  3. Typical time is 2-3 minutes per principle - then write down all ideas and go to the next principle.
  4. After using an appropriate group of principles it is strongly recommended then to move on to other groups.

Step 3. Finalize your work by evaluating ideas and then assembling them into concepts.

 


Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of Lean

Step 1. Relate revealed wastes to one of the following groups:

  • Resource (materials, energy or information) connected waste
  • Time connected waste
  • Space connected waste
  • Structure connected waste (for example, unnecessary interactions or elements)
  • Conditions connected waste

Such a classifying of wastes enables one to address inventive principles from the appropriate group to remove or reduce it.

Step 2. Apply inventive principles to uncover and utilize available resources in order to remove or reduce the wastes:

  1. Start with the group of principles most closely related to the waste identified in step 1. Use the inventive principles one by one as hints for idea generation.
  2. Define entities which could be changed in your situation (elements, actions, and environment). Apply recommendations suggested by the principle.
  3. Typical time is 2-3 minutes per principle - then write down all ideas and go to the next principle.
  4. After using an appropriate group of principles it is strongly recommended then to move on to other groups.

Step 3. Finalize your work by evaluating ideas and then assembling them into concepts.

 


Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of I-MUST

Step 1. Define UDE(s) (undesired effects):

  • Direct UDEs appear if something does not satisfy us in the existing system.
  • “Derived” UDEs appear if there isn’t a system for performing a desired activity – in such a case we define what won’t be satisfied if we use a more or less suitable system (“derived” UDEs).

Step 2. Relate revealed UDEs (undesired effects) to one of the following groups:

  • Resource (materials, energy or information) connected UDEs.
  • Time connected UDEs.
  • Space connected UDEs.
  • Structure connected UDEs (connected, for example, with interactions or elements).
  • Conditions connected UDEs.

Such a classifying of UDEs enables one to address inventive principles from the appropriate group to remove or reduce it.

Step 3. Apply inventive principles to uncover and utilize available resources in order to remove UDEs:

  1. Start with the group of principles most closely related to the UDE. Use the inventive principles one by one as hints for idea generation.
  2. Define entities which could be changed in your situation (elements, actions, and environment). Apply recommendations suggested by the principle.
  3. Typical time is 2-3 minutes per principle - then write down all ideas and go to the next principle.
  4. After using an appropriate group of principles it is strongly recommended then to move on to other groups.

Step 4. Finalize your work by evaluating ideas and then assembling them into concepts.

 


Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of SWOT

Step 1. Relate revealed (and tabled) SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) sources or causes to one of the following groups:

  • Resources (business elements, products/services, money, information etc) connected SWOT sources (strengths, opportunities) or causes (weaknesses, threats)
  • Time connected SWOT sources (strengths, opportunities) or causes (weaknesses, threats)
  • “Space” (market or position on the market, for example) connected SWOT sources (strengths, opportunities) or causes (weaknesses, threats)
  • Structure connected SWOT sources (strengths, opportunities) or causes (weaknesses, threats) - - for example, business elements and/or interactions
  • Conditions or parameters connected SWOT sources (strengths, opportunities) or causes (weaknesses, threats) – for example, business or innovation culture or activities of competitors)

Such a classifying of SWOT sources (strengths, opportunities) or causes (weaknesses, threats) enables one to address inventive principles from the appropriate group to improve / increase (strengths, opportunities) or remove / reduce (weaknesses, threats) them.

Step 2. Apply inventive principles to uncover and utilize available resources in order to improve / increase strengths and opportunity or remove / reduce weaknesses and threats:

  1. Start from group of principles related to the SWOT source or cause being considered. Use the inventive principles one by one as hints for idea generation.
  2. Define entities which could be changed in your situation (elements, activities and environment). Apply recommendations suggested by the principle.
  3. Typical time is 2-3 minutes per principle - then write down all ideas and go to the next principle.
  4. After using an appropriate group of principles it is strongly recommended then to move on to other groups.

Step 3. Finalize your work by evaluating ideas and then assembling them into concepts.

 


Using TRIZ GB in the Framework of Fishbone Diagrams

A fishbone diagram (another name is Ishikawa’s diagram) is intended to help us to identify cause and effect relationships that exist in our system. Modification of this approach with TRIZ GB enables one to increase its efficiency either for innovative (so called reverse Fishbone) or diagnostic problem solving (direct Fishbone).

In this case in the head of the modified fishbone diagram is placed what we need to accomplish (in case of innovative problem) or what we need to explain (in case of diagnostic problem). As bones of the fishbone diagram instead of the generic causes (Machines, People, Processes, Environment, Money and Measurement) we will use the five groups of TRIZ GB principles:

  • Resources,
  • Time,
  • Space,
  • Structure,
  • Conditions and Parameters.

Once we put what we need to accomplish or explain in the head of the fishbone diagram we ask ourselves, what do we need to use or change in our system in order to get this result?

Various ideas generated with TRIZ GB principles will then be split among the bones, helping us in assembling solution concept or (in case of diagnostic problem) hypotheses to be checked.

 


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